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I purchased this book after reading and rereading his great article in Cato Policy Report. May/June 1998: http://www.cato.org/pubs/policy_report/v20n3/econgrowth.pdf

I have handed this article out to many hundreds of students at various economics seminars.

Plus the first page has a nice picture of Walter Williams, P.T. Bauer, Steve Hanke, and James Dorn...

Brenner would be talking to a brick wall. US (& other) govt(s) have their scape goat for the crisis (i.e., the market). The whole atmosphere in govt circles at the moment (and maybe even within the general public) is that free market economics caused this and only state intervention can prevent it happening again.

Maybe after 10 years of econo-mic stagnation with rising unemployment and rising inflation people will begin to change their mind. But a talk by this guy will (unfortunately) achieve little.

Has Brenner actually talked about the current crisis?

Brenner has written several articles in First Things magazine. A search of their website will find them.

He wrote a bit back in Sept 2008 about the crisis which can be found on the National Post website. Here is a link to his articles posted there:
http://network.nationalpost.com/NP/blogs/fpcomment/archive/tags/Reuven+Brenner/default.aspx

I recently read his newest book "A World of Chance" which is excellent.

Vibrant financial markets are the problem!

Wall Street is mostly a creature of the macroeconomics Brenner disdains. Without the policy-induced booms and busts, there would be plenty of capital for individuals to "bet on their ideas". Government-back-stopped investment banks behaving like hedge funds on the taxpayer dime have given capitalism a pretty bad rep lately. Free market supporters need to do a better job of persuading the public that this form of "Capitolism" doesn't represent the free market. But Wall Street, in its present form, deserves its bric-bats.


Government-back-stopped investment banks behaving like hedge funds on the taxpayer dime have given capitalism a pretty bad rep lately.

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