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« Liberalism and Truth | Main | What Precisely is Aggregate Demand Failure and How Would You Know It If You Saw It? »

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Pete,

While not entirely unexpected, this is sad news. Professor Harriss sent me a really nice letter a couple of years ago after receiving an IHS letter about me. I'm glad I took the time to respond and I only wish I'd had the opportunity to meet in person. It is a shame that unless one is on the level of Paul Samuelson, your passing goes almost without notice.

Here is the Boston Globe's obituary, with a nice story by Bill Fischel.

http://www.boston.com/bostonglobe/obituaries/articles/2010/01/19/dr_c_lowell_harriss_expert_in_economics_land_policy_at_97/

I don't know how many people know this: C. Lowell Harriss was my first economics teacher! I was 16 and I was so thirsty to learn economics that I signed up for a summer course at Columbia University (Micro Principles). We used his text book. One of the things I was fascinated to learn about was Ricardian rent theory. I got a decent grade: a B. Columbia did not have B pluses in those days. I will write something at ThinkMarkets in the next few days. RIP.

I also have a nice note from Prof. Harriss; we crossed paths while I was visiting AIER in 2008. He will be missed.

In the summer of 2008, Lowell Harris delivered two lectures at the American Institute for Economic Research (AIER) for seminar students.

One of these lectures was on money and inflation. Harris about 96 years old at the time.

I can honestly say that it was one of the finest and most clear and concise presentations on the microeconomic process dynamics of inflation that I have ever heard. It was a superb explanation of the non-neutrality of money, the relative price effects from inflation, its distorting influences on production and employment, and the ambiguities in measuring changes in the purchasing power of the monetary unit.

He was an economist from another time. And I mean that as a very high complement.

Also, he was very approachable and friendly. Just a good person, as well.

And as Art Carden said, he will be missed.

Richard Ebeling

Richard Ebeling

I met him twice at AIER, probably in 2004 and 2005, although the second time may have been in 2007. He made the most persuasive case for Georgist-type taxation that I've ever heard (not that I'm entirely convinced), but what I remember most is how kind and eager he was to talk to students in AIER's fellowship program. Leo and I were just talking about him at APEE; I don't think either of us realized he'd passed away.

I met Harriss on several occasions and always found him to be a wise, witty, and courteous individual, a gentleman scholar of the old school. It was he who delivered the Nobel address for Bill Vickrey in his place when Vickrey died of a heart attack three days after the announcement of his Nobel (in a car parked by the side of the road on the way to a conference). He will be missed.

BTW, Pete, are you willing to pass on the wise words of advice that Harriss provided to you that you feel you failed to follow?

Yes, Barkley, I talk too much and failed to listen to my interviewers questions and instead went on too long in my answers. Less is more.

Harriss is someone who I periodically corresponded with since my graduate student days and he was indeed as Richard and others have said both an economists of another generation and a man amazingly gracious and interested in the younger generation coming up. Just a very good man.

I also met him at AIER - a true gentleman, he was. I wish I'd known him better.

Pete,

Thanks. You are a real mensch. Many of us should take heed of the wise words of the late scholar.

I also met Dr. Harriss several times at AIER in 2004 and 2005. Each time I was impressed by his critical thinking and insights about fiscal policy and land ownership theory. RIP.

Oh, I should have confessed that I am guilty of what Harriss said Pete was guilty of as well.

I'll chime in with a "me too" here. I first met Dr. Harriss in the summer of 2000 at AIER. It was the summer before I started graduate school. He took the time to meet with each of the student fellows at AIER and discuss what economic ideas THEY were interested in. He even followed up with a nice note a couple weeks after the visit. I wish I could remember the exact wording of his closing. It was something to the effect of "reply is welcome but not expected." Just one more example of him being kind and making it easy for a young economist to interpret what to do.

I've spent a number of summers at AIER and would often see him when I was there. He's a gentleman and a scholar and will be missed.

Ben

when I was a graduate student, and he was the editor of the American Journal of Economics & Sociology for many years. In fact, I last spoke to him in the summer of 2009 when I was being considered for the editorship of AJE&S and he sent me a short note after the board decided to go in a different

Harriss is someone who I periodically corresponded with since my graduate student days and he was indeed as Richard and others have said both an economists of another generation and a man amazingly gracious and interested in the younger generation coming up. Just a very good man.

Believe that the fate of many people are sensitive, emotional and delicate and very caring.

Them clothes got laundry numbers on them. You remember your number and always wear the ones that has your number. Any man forgets his number spends a night in the box. These here spoons you keep with you. Any man loses his spoon spends a night in the box.

I wouldn’t be too surprised to see many of those users flock to the Netflix web site and order their free disk in the days ahead.

I wouldn’t be too surprised to see many of those users flock to the Netflix web site and order their free disk in the days ahead.

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