November 2020

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30          
Blog powered by Typepad

« Who Protects the Consumer? | Main | Chris Coyne is Coming to GMU! »

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

http://www.dilbert.com/strips/comic/2009-05-10/

Thanks, Pete, for the link. Nye's article is thoughtful and well-worth reading. I agree the analysis of trust is important.

The article is stronger on philosophy than on history. Like most economists, he treats the history of capitalism as beginning in the 18th century (though he criticizes Karl Polanyi for making just that mistake).

Nye also skips quickly over the downturn of 1920-21 w/o explaining why that downturn did not turn out to be the Great Depression (as it appeared it would be at the outset). Without a theory of 1920-21, we can have no adequate theory of 1929-33.

I also think we must go back to Wilson and the Progressives to understand the bad ideas of the New Deal and its counterparts in Europe. The experience of wartime communism during the Great War inspired much that came later.

The experience of wartime communism during the Great War inspired much that came later.

The comments to this entry are closed.

Our Books