April 2014

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
    1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30      
Blog powered by Typepad

« "We can't do with philosophical definition a job that needs to be done with factual inquiry." | Main | Hard-Nosed Positive Analysis, Imaginative Normative Thinking About Institutional Innovation »

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d83451eb0069e2016767a6d00d970b

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Discussion on Austrian Economics at "Critical Thinking Applied":

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

I notice that "Lorenzo" starts off with a nasty shot at 'Austrians' -- and then finishes with another.

So much for civility.

Well Greg you can argue that Lorenzo is wrong or overly sensitive, but you can't really say that he's being nasty by raising concerns about bad treatment! There's a big difference between disagreeing with the victim and blaming the victim!

Many people share his concerns. Surely we're not all taking "nasty shots". If you thought that, then I'd start to think you're paranoid... and then you'd think I was being nasty all over again!


****

I'm having fun with Greg, but to get back on topic it really is a good post by both of them. Lorenzo has been commenting at my blog for a while and is always very thoughtful.

Its just stunning how much these people do not understand austrianism.

It's certainly a problem when those who disagree with you don't understand you. It's also a problem, alluded to by Steve in that guest post, when people who purportedly AGREE with you don't understand you. The latter problem is likely to be more frustrating, the more popular Austrianism becomes. Maybe another way to put it is that the more "Austrians" there are, the greater the variety of opinion there is likely to be among Austrians. If, as I suspect, Austrianism is going to take off and become more mainstream, it would be very useful to have a spate of modern textbooks, both introductory and advanced, generally approved by prominent Austrians, as a firm base. In fact, I wonder: to what extent do commenters here think that this textbook base already exists, and what would be on your short list (post-Mises, post-Rothbard, stuff in the last decade or two)?

The comments to this entry are closed.