December 2014

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
  1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31      
Blog powered by Typepad

« Is Subjectivism and Consequentialism Contradictory? | Main | Folks, As a Matter of Historical Fact Hayek Was Keynes's Rival in the 1930s »

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d83451eb0069e201630229a0c4970d

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference FEE Summer Seminars:

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

do you have to be an Econ student? Do you have to be pursuing a Phd? Can you just be a regular person who likes Austrian economics?

The Advanced Austrian seminar is designed for PhD students and young faculty. It is at that level of sophistication. The Freedom University: Austrian Economics one is open to all levels.

I have to admit: the only thing I look for on the FEE Austrian seminar is the lectures by Israel Kirzner. It is really great to see what Dr. Kirzner is still able to come out and deliver two lectures. I hope this continues for several years! For all the students interested in this program, I would wholeheartedly endorse it. I was fortunate to attend back in 2008, and it really is an exciting event. Don't worry about eligibility and all that --- just try to write one compelling application and I'm sure you'll get in. Emphasize your interest in libertarian ideas and Austrian economics!

I'll be there!

What about *gulp* students of law?

Brandon, what law school are you in? As a fellow law student myself, I must say that the study of law really leaves no room for other social-science studies, such as economics. That is because you cannot argue economics when the issues are legal. (Posner's proclivity to find liability based on a determination of costs and benefits is really an exception to the general practice.)

It is still true that one supreme court precedent can destroy centuries of well-established economic thought. And isn't that the beauty of the law? Law is the only area in the social sciences where there is real authority. Court opinions have a real knack for putting an end to endless debate. Sure, we may disagree with the opinion, but we all know that we are not allowed to defy the opinion. It is actually quite refreshing if you think about it, EVEN IF the opinion is entirely wrong-headed.

yes but what if these kids do not have jobs to go to.

I agree with the guy from http://www.forecastfortomorrow.com he called the market crash in 08 and eerily accuate and is calling for jobs and the economic landscape to be very different in 24 months time. I have to agree.

austrian away,

I'm not in law school juuuust yet. I confess I have a problem when it comes to planning ahead!

Law is very good at destroying things, but this exactly why hanging out with other social scientists is so important.

Which law school are you at, btw?

Unfortunately, for the first time in about 30 years I was not invited to speak at the summer Austrian economics seminar. I link here a YouTube video of a talk I gave a FEE in 1996, "A Better Concept of Coordination." So my contribution will have to be in absentia.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=d4R9bQ_iuCY

good luck to you Brandon. The law is a fascinating field of study. And it is definitely advantageous for people with initiative -- my impression is that most of the law students around me, and the lawyers I have come to meet, don't care all that much about the law. They don't follow Supreme Court cases and really don't enjoy litigating cases. So, if you have interests in these things, then the world is yours. I personally can't wait to start suing people. I am at the University of Missouri, btw.

This is a good news to newly geaduate student, by attending this seminar your are gaining a chance to expose yourself to everybody. In doing this you are enhancing your personality and public relation.

The comments to this entry are closed.