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For comparison purposes, a potential government for Somalia should be Afghanistan. Afghanistan has a similar level of development and devotion to Islam.

Once the US pulls out of Afghanistan, soon I hope, it will look like Somalia and we can do better comparisons.

Puntland shows one is not looking at "stateless" societies, at least in that part of Somalia. So it is unclear what the argument is based upon in the first place. Indigenous governance systems persist, whether or not ecsonomists or political scientists recognize them as "states".

"Puntland shows one is not looking at "stateless" societies, at least in that part of Somalia."

The Puntland authority wasn't established until 1998--seven years after the state collapsed. So, if that were your only objection, we could still consider the seven year period of statelessness.

"Indigenous governance systems persist, whether or not ecsonomists or political scientists recognize them as "states"."

This is kind of the point. Most referring to "the state" are not talking about indigenous governance systems; they are not talking about the norms and customs of individuals. They are referring to governments. Demonstrating the relative success of places and times without governments serves to emphasize the importance of governance.

Fascinating. Thanks for working on and blogging about this.

I have been trying to find this info. Just so you know I established your blog when I had looking for weblogs like my own,my blog someday and post me a ideas to let me know what you think.

Pete,
I think the whole country is in a state of anarchy. Somaliland and Puntland are best thought of as governments on paper only, not defacto in control of anything much. They hope to be recognized so they can get (and steal) aid. In addition to taxing very little, they also don't provide courts or make and/or enforce law. The same customary legal system that oporates in the south also does in Somaliland and Puntland. I go into this stuff in some detail in the published version of my JEBO paper.
Nice post and thanks for the plug.

I have some relative experience about the issues you mentioned

just as long as you get your work done and clear it with your manager.' On the surface policies like this sound like my idea of heaven, as I believe strongly in a good work/life balance, I love to travel, and I'm self-disciplined. But as you'll hear in the piece, how well the policy works depends on the company that institutes it.

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