November 2014

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
            1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30            
Blog powered by Typepad

« On Reading Hayek: Rules and the General Welfare, or Why Mises I (discussed by Richard Ebeling) Might Have to Give Way to Mises II (too often dismissed as dogmatic) | Main | Some Questions for my Faculty Colleagues on the Left »

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d83451eb0069e20120a9371821970b

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Greg Mankiw on Choosing Where to Go to Graduate School:

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

That is all good advice from Mankiw, but this one is particulary good:

8. Don't be distressed if you did not get into your top choice. What you do in graduate school (or college) is far more important than where you go. Your personal drive matters more than the ranking of the school you attend.

I think the experiences that GMU students have had over the last 20+ years bear this out, as the ones who have done great things in grad school got good jobs, even back in the old days when GMU wasn't as highly ranked as now.

And as someone on the demand side of the PhD labor market, this is the way I approach job applicants and I have largely, though not completely, persuaded my department over the years that it is the better way than the pedigree of the department. Give me the hungry, productive grad student from the 30th or 50th ranked school over the dregs of Harvard ANY time.

The best undergraduates at SLU are the top kids from the mostly un-spectacular high schools in a 100 mile radius. They are much more engaged and interesting, in general, than the B and C students from the very well-known prep schools or big suburban high schools.

Hungry and productive is way more important than pedigree.

I've been wondering something, and this is as good a thread as any to ask. I'm sure I would have a great time as a GMU graduate student in economics, but I don't want an academic career. Would a MA or PhD from GMU be of any use in gaining entry to a career in corporate finance or other fields of business? Have any recent graduates been able to do this? Thanks.

I have applied for the Ph.D. program at the GMU but haven't heard back yet. Any idea when they will let us know about admission decisions?

GMU is my dream school. Hope I'll get to meet you all some day.

kinda funny how he points to the rankings where (of course) harvard is at the top of each one :-)

Look, the process hasn't been perfect and this wasn't the bill I was hoping for. Politics is never perfect. But if you've honestly convinced yourself that this little analogy of yours is a good representation of what's going on, then you're clearly too mired in your own opinion of the reform to frame what's going on objectively.

The comments to this entry are closed.